theme by pouretrebelle
malformalady:

Traumatic cataract with an iridodialysis (separation of the iris from it’s attachment to the ciliary body) from a blunt injury during childhood.
Photo credit: Cindy Montague, CRA

malformalady:

Traumatic cataract with an iridodialysis (separation of the iris from it’s attachment to the ciliary body) from a blunt injury during childhood.

Photo credit: Cindy Montague, CRA

veganvibez:

Almond milk and cereal are so tasty

veganvibez:

Almond milk and cereal are so tasty

monicaspeaceofmind:

It’s such a pet peeve for me when people aren’t inclusive

Like I always make an effort to bring everyone together

I was raised to do that

Everyone has been in the position of being left out, and no one likes it

officially discharged after ~3 years!!! yay

compoundchem:

The second graphic in the ‘Undeserved Reputations’ series looks at Monosodium Glutamate, or MSG, and the myths surrounding it. You can see a larger version of the graphic and read more here: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-msgThere’s also a great ACS Reactions video on the subject here: http://bit.ly/MSGreactions

compoundchem:

The second graphic in the ‘Undeserved Reputations’ series looks at Monosodium Glutamate, or MSG, and the myths surrounding it. 

You can see a larger version of the graphic and read more here: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-msg

There’s also a great ACS Reactions video on the subject here: http://bit.ly/MSGreactions

Anonymous asked:
I ate lots of fruit for lunch and brakefast but in the night I had a huge pb sandwich, am I going to gain weight because of the fat? :(

annabanana-1:

My pal I mix fruit and fats together all the time, nothing to stress about!

I know there is a lot of hype around carbs and not much fat at the moment, but fat isn’t a bad thing - especially the kind found in nuts! Please do not let it stress you out. There is no such thing as a ‘bad’ food, only a bad mindset. Embrace the pb, it’s one of my favourite snacks too :)

If macros are messing up your mind, just forget them! Find what works for you. You don’t need to eat at a certain ratio every day if you don’t want to! I certainly don’t and I’ve never been healthier or happier xx

I love the “no bad food but bad mindset” thing :)))

dada-rococo-happening:

My adventures at the art institute today

back from France ::::’( 

fangirlatlarge:

simulatedcity:

evnw:

tofutits:

This is so FUCKING SCARY

what the fuck is going on

THIS IS THE ONLY TIME I WILL EVER SAY THIS. NO MATTER WHAT KIND OF BLOG YOU ARE RUNNING REBLOG THIS. THIS CRAP NEEDS TO BE KNOWN. NEEDS TO BE SEEN. AND NEEDS TO BE SPREAD.THIS IS HAPPENING IN MY STATE AND IT IS FUCKING TERRIFYING. LET IT BE KNOWN. DON’T STOP SPREADING THE NEWS. MAKE EVERYONE SEE THE SHIT THAT IS GOING DOWN. Please. No body else seems to be protecting them anymore. Do what you can.

unamusedsloth:

So many things to ponder in bear life.

neurosciencestuff:

Children’s drawings indicate later intelligence
How 4-year old children draw pictures of a child is an indicator of intelligence at age 14, according to a study by the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, published today in Psychological Science.
The researchers studied 7,752 pairs of identical and non-identical twins (a total of 15,504 children) from the Medical Research Council (MRC) funded Twins Early Development Study (TEDS), and found that the link between drawing and later intelligence was influenced by genes.
At the age of 4, children were asked by their parents to complete a ‘Draw-a-Child’ test, i.e. draw a picture of a child. Each figure was scored between 0 and 12 depending on the presence and correct quantity of features such as head, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hair, body, arms etc. For example, a drawing with two legs, two arms, a body and head, but no facial features, would score 4. The children were also given verbal and non-verbal intelligence tests at ages 4 and 14.
The researchers found that higher scores on the Draw-a-Child test were moderately associated with higher scores of intelligence at ages 4 and 14. The correlation between drawing and intelligence was moderate at ages 4 (0.33) and 14 (0.20).
Dr Rosalind Arden, lead author of the paper from the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, says: “The Draw-a-Child test was devised in the 1920’s to assess children’s intelligence, so the fact that the test correlated with intelligence at age 4 was expected.What surprised us was that it correlated with intelligence a decade later.”
“The correlation is moderate, so our findings are interesting, but it does not mean that parents should worry if their child draws badly. Drawing ability does not determine intelligence, there are countless factors, both genetic and environmental, which affect intelligence in later life.”
The researchers also measured the heritability of figure drawing. Identical twins share all their genes, whereas non-identical twins only share about 50 percent, but each pair will have a similar upbringing, family environment and access to the same materials.
Overall, at age 4, drawings from identical twins pairs were more similar to one another than drawings from non-identical twin pairs. Therefore, the researchers concluded that differences in children’s drawings have an important genetic link. They also found that drawing at age 4 and intelligence at age 14 had a strong genetic link.
Dr Arden explains: “This does not mean that there is a drawing gene – a child’s ability to draw stems from many other abilities, such as observing, holding a pencil etc. We are a long way off understanding how genes influence all these different types of behaviour.”
Dr Arden adds: “Drawing is an ancient behaviour, dating back beyond 15,000 years ago. Through drawing, we are attempting to show someone else what’s in our mind. This capacity to reproduce figures is a uniquely human ability and a sign of cognitive ability, in a similar way to writing, which transformed the human species’ ability to store information, and build a civilisation.”

THIS IS AHERE I DID WORK EXPERIENCE

neurosciencestuff:

Children’s drawings indicate later intelligence

How 4-year old children draw pictures of a child is an indicator of intelligence at age 14, according to a study by the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, published today in Psychological Science.

The researchers studied 7,752 pairs of identical and non-identical twins (a total of 15,504 children) from the Medical Research Council (MRC) funded Twins Early Development Study (TEDS), and found that the link between drawing and later intelligence was influenced by genes.

At the age of 4, children were asked by their parents to complete a ‘Draw-a-Child’ test, i.e. draw a picture of a child. Each figure was scored between 0 and 12 depending on the presence and correct quantity of features such as head, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hair, body, arms etc. For example, a drawing with two legs, two arms, a body and head, but no facial features, would score 4. The children were also given verbal and non-verbal intelligence tests at ages 4 and 14.

The researchers found that higher scores on the Draw-a-Child test were moderately associated with higher scores of intelligence at ages 4 and 14. The correlation between drawing and intelligence was moderate at ages 4 (0.33) and 14 (0.20).

Dr Rosalind Arden, lead author of the paper from the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, says: “The Draw-a-Child test was devised in the 1920’s to assess children’s intelligence, so the fact that the test correlated with intelligence at age 4 was expected.What surprised us was that it correlated with intelligence a decade later.”

“The correlation is moderate, so our findings are interesting, but it does not mean that parents should worry if their child draws badly. Drawing ability does not determine intelligence, there are countless factors, both genetic and environmental, which affect intelligence in later life.”

The researchers also measured the heritability of figure drawing. Identical twins share all their genes, whereas non-identical twins only share about 50 percent, but each pair will have a similar upbringing, family environment and access to the same materials.

Overall, at age 4, drawings from identical twins pairs were more similar to one another than drawings from non-identical twin pairs. Therefore, the researchers concluded that differences in children’s drawings have an important genetic link. They also found that drawing at age 4 and intelligence at age 14 had a strong genetic link.

Dr Arden explains: “This does not mean that there is a drawing gene – a child’s ability to draw stems from many other abilities, such as observing, holding a pencil etc. We are a long way off understanding how genes influence all these different types of behaviour.”

Dr Arden adds: “Drawing is an ancient behaviour, dating back beyond 15,000 years ago. Through drawing, we are attempting to show someone else what’s in our mind. This capacity to reproduce figures is a uniquely human ability and a sign of cognitive ability, in a similar way to writing, which transformed the human species’ ability to store information, and build a civilisation.”

THIS IS AHERE I DID WORK EXPERIENCE

dildorrito:

what’s the password

dildorrito:

what’s the password

(Source: tibets)

overcome-your-dem0ns:

Steve-o, the man after my own heart.

overcome-your-dem0ns:

Steve-o, the man after my own heart.

(Source: cuddlyxcal)